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One of the very best things you can do to give your pet a long and healthy life is to ensure that he/she is vaccinated against common and serious infectious diseases. Your pet's mother gave them immunity from disease for the first few weeks of existence by providing disease-fighting antibodies in her milk. After that period it's up to you - with the help and advice of your veterinary surgeon - to provide that protection.

For pet advice from experienced and knowledgeable vets, call

01476 563 371

How do vaccines work?

Vaccines contain small quantities of altered or "killed" viruses, bacteria or other disease-causing organisms. When administered, they stimulate your pet's immune system to produce disease-fighting cells and proteins - or antibodies - to protect against disease

Protecting your cat against disease

When should my cat be vaccinated?

Generally, the immunity that a kitten has at birth only lasts for a few weeks. It is then time to begin vaccination. The first vaccination is usually given in two doses, the first dose at around the age of 8-10 weeks and the second about 3-4 weeks later. Thereafter, your cat will require an annual 'booster' vaccination for the rest of his/her life to maintain protection. Of course, these are only guidelines - your veterinary surgeon will be able to determine the exact schedule that's right for your pet.

Which vaccinations should my cat receive?

Your pet should be protected against those diseases which are most common, highly contagious and which cause serious illness or death. Such diseases include feline panleucopaenia, cat flu which may be caused by feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus and feline leukaemia. Feline chlamydiosis, Bordetella bronchiseptica (another potential cause of cat flu) or rabies vaccination may also be recommended, based on your veterinary surgeon's evaluation of the risks posed by such factors as your cat's age, particular environment and lifestyle.

Protecting your dog against disease

When should my dog be vaccinated?

The immunity that a puppy has at birth only lasts for a few weeks. It is then time to begin vaccination. The first vaccination is usually given in two doses, the first dose at around the age of 6-8 weeks and the second about 2-4 weeks later. Thereafter, your dog will require annual 'booster' vaccinations for the rest of his/her life to maintain protection. Above all, follow the vaccination schedule recommended by your veterinary surgeon - if there is too long an interval between vaccinations, your dog may no longer be fully protected.

What vaccinations should my dog receive?

Your dog should be protected against those diseases which are most common, highly contagious and which cause serious illness or death. Such diseases include Canine Parvovirus, Canine Distemper, Infectious Canine Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parainfluenza and Infectious Tracheobronchitis (also known as kennel cough). Rabies may also be essential if your dog is travelling abroad - check with the practice and with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).

Protecting your rabbit against disease

When should my rabbit be vaccinated?

Here at Avenue Vets we give a combined vaccination that can be used from 5 weeks of age.

Boosters are given annually.

What vaccinations should my rabbit receive?

Your rabbit should be vaccinated routinely against Viral Haemorrhage Disease (VHD) and Myxomatosis. Both these viral diseases can be rapidly fatal in an unvaccinated rabbit and there are no cures once infected. The only protection you can give your rabbit is by vaccination. VHD is spread by direct contact between rabbits (both wild and domesticated) but also via indirect contact such as from people, clothing, on shoes, other objects and fleas. Myxomatosis is spread mainly by fleas or other biting insects and is transmitted in this way from wild to pet rabbits.

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Protecting your horse against disease

When should my horse be vaccinated?

Foals should start their vaccinations from a young age, typically four to six months of age, depending on the vaccine used and the presence of antibodies that they will have received from their mother in the milk. The initial course for foals and adults alike is two injections given generally 4-6 weeks apart, with a third injection required 6 months later. Following this third injection, the manufacturer's recommendation for subsequent vaccination should be followed and is typically every 12 months. 

What Vaccinations should my horse receive?

Your horse should be routinely vaccinated against Equine Influenza and Tetanus. Equine Influenza (Flu) spreads very rapidly and can have significant economic implications due to loss of performance as well as the ill health of an infected horse. Tetanus vaccination is recommended whether or not your horse leaves the yard or meets other horses as the organism responsible for infection is everywhere in the environment.

Protecting your farm animals against disease

What vaccinations should my farm animals receive?

Most farm vaccines are specifically tailored to the individual farm and species so please give us a call for more information on 01476 563371.

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Vaccinations